Nuestra historia Vista por las mejores cámaras: 51 #GRelatos

I'm not talking about personal brand, but stories and images that have left us an eternal mark. I have baptized them as #GRelatos, using my initials to make them easier found.

Meet the series #GRelatos

#GRelatos is the union of two personal passions, photography and historical history. I grew up with a lab inside the house, where I revealed and expanded my own photographs. My first job “Official” went to the 16 at the agency BBDO weather as a lab assistant. I got to work with a little gem, The Hasselblad 2000FC 6x6mm. It wasn't mine., Of course, me then I wouldn't have been able to afford to even rent it for a day. It belonged to the defunc agency MassMedia Marketing and Advertising, by Jordi Argenter Giralt, my uncle “MadMen”.

And I've always liked the historical story. Especially after the invention of photography, where reality prevails (although not always) to the fiction of the great masters of painting or sculpture.

#GRelatos is a series, my little one tribute to the best photographers in history, and especially the narratives of his photographs. Everyone has seen Albert Einstein's photographing sticking out his tongue. Few know he was angry and tired, who mocked the photo-journalists who harassed him on the day of his anniversary, and less have seen the full picture of the genie inside a car next to Dr.. Frank Aydelotte and his wife Marie Jeanette.

It's shorter than no story

I recognize that we are at a time when attention economy demand rapid impacts. #GRelatos are short stories, one image and just two paragraphs of storytelling. Many of the photographs I choose, What, Of course, they're not mine, are known to many, but not so the contexts or consequences of what happened before, During, and after the camera shot.

Some may think that those are superficial stories, but better short than non-existent. I decided on a risky format: publish those stories on a social network that's not mine. Maybe that's accentuating that fleetingness of the moment that's already happened., of photography as an irreplaceable witness to what happened. Posting on a social network as a Instagram I expose myself to the whim of Zuckerberg or for an anachronistic Parliament like the European to forbid me to share images that have made history on a stupid bureaucratic issue.

A tribute to the best photographers

This is a tribute to the best. From photo-journalists to fashion photographers, passing through some whose name has remained hidden by the dictatorships of this sick world. But most of all, is a tribute to the apparent ease of these professionals to explain things to us with the opening and closing of a shutter.

Here I put the first 51 Publications, but I hope that this will continue, at the rate of about seven #GRelatos a week.

51 #GRelatos

There goes that. I hope you like it.. If you want to follow the next ones, follow the hashtag #GRelatos on Instagram.

 

 

See this post on Instagram

 

The pilow flight. Harry Benson, 1964. Harry Benson didn't want to meet the Beatles. The Glasgow-born photographer planned to cover a news story in Africa when he was assigned the task of photographing musicians in Paris. “I took for a serious journalist and didn't want to cover a rock'n story’ Roll”, mocked. But once he met the Liverpool boys and heard them play, Benson didn't want to leave.. “Thought:'God, I'm in the perfect place'”. “The Beatles were on the cusp of greatness, and Benson was in the middle of it. Your pillow fight photo, taken at the luxurious George V Hotel the night the band discovered that “I Want to Hold Your Hand” was the number 1 in the United States, freezes John, Paul, George and Ringo in a lush cascade of youthful talent, and perhaps his last moment of unbridled innocence. Capture joy, happiness and optimism that would embrace like Beatlemania and that helped lift America's morale only 11 weeks after the assassination of John F. Kennedy. The following month, Benson accompanied the Fab Four on their trip to New York City to appear on The Ed Sullivan Show, starting the British invasion. The trip led to decades of collaboration with the group and, as Benson later recalled, “I was so close not to be there”. _________________________________#time100bestphotos #storytelling #photo #historyphoto #thebeatles_____#GRelatos_____

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

The greeting "Black power". John Dominis 1968 The Olympic Games are meant to be a celebration of global unity. But when American sprinters Tommie Smith and John Carlos climbed to the medal stand at the Games of 1968 In Mexico City, were determined to shatter the illusion that everything was fine in the world. Just before “The Star-Spangled Banner” it's going to start ringing, Smith, the gold medalist, and Carlos, the bronze winner, bowed their heads and raised their fists with black gloves in the air. Your message could not have been clearer: Before greeting to America, America should treat blacks as equals. “We knew that what we were going to do was much greater than any athletic feat”, Said Charles later. John Dominis, a fast-firing photographer known for capturing unexpected moments, made a close-up that revealed another layer: Smith in black socks, no running shoes, in a gesture that symbolizes the poverty of blacks. Published in life, Dominis's image turned the grim protest into an iconic emblem of the turbulent decade of the 60 ________________________________#GRelatos #time100bestphotos #storytelling #photo #historyphoto #blackpower_____

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Windblown Jackie. Ron Galella, 1971 People just didn't get tired of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, the beautiful widow of the murdered President who married a fabulously rich Greek shipping magnate. He was a public figure with a highly guarded private life, which made her a privileged target for photographers who followed her everywhere. And none of them devoted themselves as much to capturing the former First Lady as Ron Galella. One of the celebrity paparazzi, Galella created today's model with a tracking and ambush style that caught everyone, from Michael Jackson and Sophia Loren to Marlon Brando, who was so resentful of Galella's attention that he ripped five of the photographer's teeth. But Galella's favorite theme was Jackie O., who he shot to the point of obsessing. It was Galella's relentless fixation that led him to get in a cab and follow Onassis after he saw her on the Upper East Side of New York City in October 1971. The driver honked his horn and Galella clicked on the shutter just as Onassis turned to look in his direction. “I don't think she knew it was me.”, Recalled. “That's why he smiled a little.” The picture, that Galella called proudly “my Mona Lisa”, radiates the unprotected spontaneity that marks a great photo of celebrities. “It was the iconic photograph of the aristocracy of American celebrities and created a genre”, says writer Michael Gross. The image also tested the blurry line between the gathering of news and the personal rights of a public figure. Jackie, who was bothered by constant attention, took Galella back to court and finally forbade him to photograph his family. __________________________________#time100bestphotos #storytelling #photo #historyphoto #paparazzi_____#GRelatos_____

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Untitled Film Still #21. Cindy Sherman, 1978 Since he broke into the art scene in the late 1990s 1970, the Cindy Sherman person has always remained hidden by the Cindy Sherman object. Through ingenious and deliberately confusing self-portraits taken in family circumstances but artificial, Sherman introduced photography as postmodern performance art. From his Untitled Film Stills series, #21 (“City Girl”) remembers a frame of a B-movie or an opening scene of an old TV show. However, the images are entirely Sherman's creations, which puts the viewer in the role of involuntary voyeur. Instead of capturing real life with the click of a shutter, Sherman uses photography as an artistic tool to deceive and captivate. His images have become some of the most valuable photographs ever produced. Manipulating viewers and reformulating their own identity, Sherman created a new place for photography in the fine arts. And he showed that even photography allows people to be something that's not. ________________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #fakephoto Follow these stories in #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Brian Ridley & Lyle Heeter. Robert Mapplethorpe, 1979 In 1979, when Robert Mapplethorpe photographed Brian Ridley and Lyle Heeter in their sadomasochistic attire, American culture was not very open to homosexuality. At work, gay employees were largely hidden. In many states, expressing your love could be a crime. Mapplethorpe passed 10 years documenting S's underground gay scene&M, a world even further away from the public's view. His intimate and highly stylized portraits highlighted him, maybe none more than Brian Ridley and Lyle Heeter. Both men are dressed in leather, with the submissive tied with chains and the dominant companion with the reins in one hand and one fuse in the other. However, men are placed in a living room that otherwise has nothing extraordinary, a juxtaposition that adds a layer of normalcy to a relationship that is outside the bounds of what most Americans considered acceptable at the time. The painting and the series of which he was a part opened the doors for a number of photographers and artists to examine without complexes gay life and sexuality. Nearly a decade later, Mapplethorpe's work continued to provoke. An exhibition featuring his photographs of scenes from S&M gay took to a Cincinnati art museum and his director to be accused of obscenity. (Mapplethorpe died of AIDS in 1989, a year before the trial began.) The museum and its director were finally acquitted, which reinforced Mapplethorpe's legacy as a bold pioneer whose work deserved a public display. ______________________________#time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #gayworld_____#GRelatos_____

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Tank man. Jeff Widener, 1989 On the morning of the 5 June, June, 1989, photographer Jeff Widener was on a balcony on the sixth floor of the Beijing Hotel. It was a day after the Tiananmen Square massacre, when Chinese troops attacked pro-democracy protesters who camped in the square. The Associated Press sent Widener to document the consequences. While photographing the bloody victims, passers-by by bike and burnt bus, a column of tanks began to leave the square. Widener lined up his lens just as a man wearing shopping bags stood in front of the war machines, waving his arms and refusing to move. Tanks tried to surround the man, but he went back in his way, briefly rising above one. Widener assumed the man would die, but the tanks didn't fire. At last, the man was set apart, but not before Widener immortalized his singular act of resistance. Others also captured the scene, but Widener's image was transmitted over the AP cable and appeared on the front flats around the world. Decades after tank man became a global hero, still unidentified. Anonymity makes photography even more universal, a symbol of resistance to unfair regimes around the world. ____________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #tankman Follow these stories in #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Kathrine Switzer’ Marathon. Harry Trask, Boston Herald, 1967 Race officer Jock Semple tried to for force the running @KathrineSwitzer the Boston Marathon in 1967 simply because she was a woman. Fortunately for Switzer, her boyfriend gave her a hand and she was able to reach the finish line. Switzer was inspired by the incident to create athletics events for women around the world and was a leader in bringing the women's marathon to the Olympics. When this photo first appeared in 1967, this was the original legend: “Hopkinton, Massachusetts, 19 April 1967: Who says chivalry is dead? When a girl who appears on the list as “K:i”. Switzer from Syracuse” was about to be kicked out of the Boston Marathon, normally male, and instead his partner Thomas Miller, Syracuse, threw a block that kicked out a race official. The sequence shows Jock Semple, Official, moving to intercept Miss. Switzer, and then being bounced by Miller. Photos by Harry Trask by Boston Traveler. " ________________________ #bestphotosever #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #8M #mujeresconmarca #diamundialdelamujer #internationalwomenday Follow these stories in #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

cowboy. Richard Prince, 1989 The idea for the project that would break everything written about copyright in photography came to Richard Prince while working in the pink press department at Time Inc.. While deconstructing the pages of the magazines for the archives, a particular ad caught his eye: the sexist and archetypal image of the Marlboro man riding horses under the blue sky. And so, in a process he came to call repopulation, Prince took pictures of the ads and cut the guy, leaving only the iconic cowboy and his surroundings. That Prince didn't take the original photo meant little to collectors.. In 2005 "Cowboy" sold for 1,2 millions of dollars at auction, the highest publicly recorded price for the sale of a contemporary photograph. Others were less enthusiastic. Prince was sued by a photographer for using copyrighted images, but the courts failed in favor of Prince. That wasn't his only win.. Prince's photography helped create a new art form -- photography photography- that prefigured the era of digital sharing and changed our understanding of the authenticity and ownership of a photograph. ____________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #marlboroman #cowboy Follow these stories in #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Demi Moore. Annie Leibovitz, 1991 Hollywood star Demi Moore was seven months pregnant with her second child when she appeared on the cover of Vanity Fair as she came into the world. Such an exhibition was not unusual for Moore, who immortalized the birth of his first child with three video cameras. But it was unprecedented for a conventional media. The retratist Annie Leibovitz made an image celebrating pregnancy, showing how motherhood could be not only empowering but also sexy. The editor of the magazine, Tina Brown, regarded Moore's act as a courageous statement, “a new young movie star willing to say:'I'm beautiful pregnant', and he's not ashamed of it'”. The photo was the first media photo to sexualize pregnancy, and for many it was too shocking to appear in kiosks. Some supermarket chains refused to sell the magazine, while others covered it up as if it were pornography. It wasn't., Of course. But it was a provocative magazine cover, and did what only the best covers can do: change the culture. Pregnancy was once a relatively private matter, even for public figures. After Leibovitz's photo, celebrity births, Nude maternity photos and paparazzi photos of baby bumps have become business for themselves. ____________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #pregnancy #demimoore #AnnieLeibovitz Follow these stories in #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Pillars of Creation, fish trap, 1995 It wasn't long before the Hubble Space Telescope didn't get it.. Carried in 1990 aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery, exceeded the budget, it was years late and, when it finally reached orbit, fell short and his mirror of 2,5 meters was distorted as a result of a manufacturing defect. It wouldn't be until 1993 that a repair mission would put Hubble online. At last, The 1 April 1995, the telescope managed to capture an image of the universe so clear and profound that it has become known as the "Pillars of Creation". What hubble photographed is the Eagle Nebula, a patch that forms stars 6.500 light-years of the Earth in the constellation Serpens Cauda. Large chimneys are vast clouds of interstellar dust, formed by high-energy winds blowing from nearby stars (the black part at the top right is the expansion of one of hubble's four cameras). But the science of pillars has been the least part of its importance. Some of the pillars are 5 light years, A 30 billions of miles. One image achieved what a thousand astronomy symposia could never achieve. ____________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #universe #hubble Follow these stories in #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

First image sent by mobile phone. Philippe Kahn, 1997 Boredom can be a powerful incentive. In 1997, Philippe Kahn was with nothing to do in a Northern California maternity ward. Software epecialist, his wife kicked him out of the delivery room while she gave birth to her daughter, Sophie. So Kahn busied himself building a device you send a photo of his newborn daughter to friends and family in real time. Like any other invention, it was a rudimentary facility: a digital camera connected to your mobile phone, synchronized by a few lines of code he had written on his laptop in the hospital. What he did transformed the world: Kahn's device captured his daughter's early moments and instantly transmitted them to more than 2.000 People. Kahn soon refined his ad hoc prototype, and in the year 2000 Sharp used its technology to launch the first commercially available integrated camera phone, in Japan. Phones were introduced to the U.S. market a few years later and soon became ubiquitous. Kahn's invention forever altered the way we communicate, we perceived and experienced the world and laid the foundation for smartphones and photo-sharing apps like @Instagram and Snapchat. Phones are now used to send hundreds of millions of images around the world every day, including a good number of baby photos. ____________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #mobileworld #instantimages #smartphone Follow these stories in #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Surfing hippos. Michael Nichols, 2000 Seven billion human beings take up a lot of space, and that's one of the reasons why wild nature is rapidly declining around the world. Even in Africa, where lions and elephants still roam, space for wild animals is shrinking. That's what makes Michael Nichols' photography so special. Nichols and the national geographic society explorer, Michael Fay, undertook an arduous walk of 2.000 miles from Congo in Central Africa to Gabon, on the west coast of the continent. That's where Nichols captured a photograph of something amazing: some hippos swimming in the middle of midnight in the Atlantic Ocean. It was an event few had seen before. Hippos spend most of their time in the water, and its most likely habitat is an inland river or a swamp, not the open sea. Photography itself is of wild beauty, the eyes and snout of the hippo peeking just above the undulating surface of the ocean. But its effect was more than aesthetic. Gabon's President, Omar Bongo, was inspired by Nichols' images to create a system of national parks that now cover the 11 percent of the country, securing a space for nature. ____________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #hippos #gabon Follow these stories in #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

The situation room. Pete Souza, 2011 Official White House photographers often document presidents in their leisure and work moments, on the phone with world leaders and presiding over Oval Office meetings. And sometimes this unique access allows them to capture key moments that become collective memory. The 1 May 2011, Pete Souza was in the Crisis Room when U.S. forces stormed Pakistani Osama bin Laden complex and killed the terrorist leader. However, Souza's image does not include eer the armed raid or bin Laden. Instead, caught those who were watching the secret operation in real time. President Barack Obama made the decision to launch the attack, but like everybody else in the room, is a mere spectator of his decision. With a frown, Obama looks closely at the operation through the monitors. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton covers her mouth, waiting to see the result. In a national speech delivered that night from the White House, Obama announced that bin Laden had been executed. Photographs of the body have never been published, leaving Souza's and the tension he captured as the only public image of the moment when the war on terror got its most important victory. ____________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #situationroom #whitehouse Follow these stories in #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

North Korea. David Guttenfelder, 2013 David Guttenfelder was responsible for photography at the Associated Press for Asia when the agency became the first international news organization to open an office in North Korea. He began making frequent trips to the country, which had been largely out of reach of foreign journalists and practically hidden from the public eye for almost 60 Years. Guttenfelder chronicled official events and competitions organized in Pyongyang, but his gaze kept wandering through the scenes of everyday life beyond guided tours. Earlier 2013, North Korea made available to foreigners a 3G connection, and suddenly Guttenfelder had the ability to share those images with the world in real time. The 18 January 2013, used his iPhone to send one of the first images to Instagram from inside the country. “The window to North Korea has opened another crack”, wrote in his widely followed account. “Meanwhile, for Koreans who won't have access to the same service, the window remains closed.” Using the emerging technology of the sharing age, Guttenfelder opened one of the world's tightest societies. It also inspired other foreign visitors to do the same, creating a portrait of the monotony of everyday life that is not visible in the overall coverage of totalitarian state and bringing to the outside world its clearest image so far of North Korea. ____________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #thewindow #korea Follow these stories in #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Oscars Selfie. Bradley Cooper,2014 Photography came on an Internet saturated with celebrities. In the middle of the Oscars ceremony 2014, hostess Ellen DeGeneres got into the crowd and cornered some of the world's biggest stars. While Bradley Cooper was holding the phone, Meryl Streep, Brad Pitt, Jennifer Lawrence and Kevin Spacey, among others, they joined their faces and laughed. But it was what DeGeneres did next that turned this Hollywood banality into a transformative image. After Cooper took the picture, DeGeneres posted it immediately on Twitter, where she was retwented more than 3 millions of times, more than any other picture in history. It was also a huge advertising campaign for Samsung. DeGeneres used this brand's phone for selfie, and the brand was prominently displayed on the televised show “selfie moment”. Samsung has maintained some discretion over the scope of the action, but his PR firm acknowledged that his value could be up to 1.000 millions of dollars. This would never have been possible without the incredible speed and ease with which images can be spread all over the world. ____________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #selfie #hollywoodoscars Follow these stories in #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

The Last Battle of Allende. Luis Orlando Lagos, 1973 Salvador Allende was the first democratically elected Marxist head of state. He became president of Chile in 1970 mandated to transform the country. Nationalized U.S.-owned companies, turned properties into cooperatives, froze prices, raised wages and printed money to fund the changes. But the economy staggered, inflation soared and riots grew. In late August 1973, Allende appointed army commander Augusto Pinochet. Eighteen days later, conservative general orchestrated a coup d'an. Allende refused to leave. Armed with an AK-47 and protected only by loyal guards at his side, broadcast his final speech on the radio, with the sound of gunfire as a backdrop. When Santiago's presidential palace was bombed, Luis Orlando Lagos, Allende's official photographer, captured one of his last moments. Shortly the next, Allende committed suicide, though for decades many believed he had been killed by advancing troops. Fearing for his own life, Lagos fled. During the nearly 17 years of Pinochet's rule, 40.000 Chileans were questioned, Tortured, killed or disappeared. Lagos photo appeared anonymously. He won the World Press Photo of the Year award 1973 and became an image that immortalized Allende as a hero who chose death over dishonor. Only after Lagos' death in 2007 the identity of the photographer was known. ____________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #chile #allende Follow these stories in #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

A man on the moon. Neil Armstrong, fish trap 1969 Somewhere in the Sea of Tranquility, where Buzz Aldrin was on the night of the 20 July 1969, there is still one of the billions of wells and craters on the moon's ancient surface. But it may not be the astronaut's most indelible mark.. A Aldrin never mind being the second man on the moon to get this far and the historic appointment of Neil Armstrong first man who won was lost by just a few centimeters and minutes. But Aldrin earned another kind of immortality. As it was Armstrong who wore the Hasselblad of 70 millimetres of crew, took all the pictures, which means that the only Earthlings you would clearly see would be the ones who took the second steps. That this image has weathered the way it has done was unlikely. Does not include photos of Aldrin coming down the lunar module ladder, nor the patriotic resonance of his greeting to the American flag. It's just there., motionless instead, an often fragile man in a distant world, a world that would be happy to kill him if he took off a single garment from his extremely complex attire. His arm is bent awkwardly, because he was looking at the control indicators on his wrist. And Armstrong, even smaller and more spectral, reflected in his visor. It's a bad image if the intention was to convey heroism. But it was positive and lasting. ____________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #manonthemoon #moon Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Invasión de Praga. Josef Koudelka, 1968 A Soviet bothered them “socialismo de rostro humanoque el gobierno de Alexander Dubcek trajo a Checoslovaquia. Temiendo que las reformas de Dubcek en materia de derechos humanos llevaran a un levantamiento democrático como el de Hungría en 1956, las fuerzas del Bloque de Varsovia se propusieron anular el movimiento. Sus tanques llegaron a Checoslovaquia el 20 de agosto de 1968. Y mientras tomaban rápidamente el control de Praga, inesperadamente se toparon con masas de ciudadanos que ondeaban banderas, que levantaban barricadas, apedreaban tanques, tumbaban camiones e incluso quitaban los letreros de las calles para confundir a las tropas. Josef Koudelka, un joven ingeniero nacido en Moravia que había estado tomando fotos de la vida checa, estaba en la capital cuando llegaron los soldados. Tomó fotos de la revuelta y creó un registro sin precedentes de la invasión que cambiaría el curso de su nación. La pieza más importante incluye el brazo de un hombre en primer plano, que muestra en su reloj de pulsera un momento de la invasión soviética con una calle desierta en la distancia. Encapsula maravillosamente el tiempo, la pérdida y el vacío, y el estrangulamiento de una sociedad. Los recuerdos visuales de Koudelka sobre el conflicto en curso -con su evidencia del tiempo, la brutalidad del ataque y los desafíos de los ciudadanos checos- redefinieron el fotoperiodismo. Sus fotografías salieron de Checoslovaquia y aparecieron en el London Sunday Times en 1969, aunque bajo el seudónimo P.P. de Fotógrafo de Praga, ya que Koudelka temía represalias. Pronto huyó, su razón de ser para dejar el país como testimonio del poder de la evidencia fotográfica: “Tenía miedo de volver a Checoslovaquia porque sabía que si querían averiguar quién era el fotógrafo desconocido, podían hacerlo”. ____________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #Czechoslovakia #Prague Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

El baño de Mao en el Yangtze. Fotógrafo desconocido, 1966 Después de décadas dirigiendo el Partido Comunista Chino y luego su nación, Mao Zedong comenzó a preocuparse por su legado de marca personal. El Presidente, of the 72 años de edad, también temía que su huella se viera socavada por los movimientos de la contrarrevolución. So in July 1966, con el objetivo de asegurarse el poder, Mao se sumergió en el río Yangtze para demostrar al mundo que seguía gozando de buena salud. Fue un acto de pura propaganda. La imagen de ese baño, una de las pocas fotos del líder que circuló masivamente, hizo exactamente lo que Mao esperaba. De regreso en Pekín, Mao lanzó su Gran Revolución Cultural Proletaria, movilizando a las masas para purgar a sus rivales. Su control sobre el poder era más fuerte que nunca. Mao alistó a los jóvenes de la nación e imploró a los Guardias Rojos a quese atrevieran a ser violentos”. La locura se desató rápidamente sobre aquella China de 750 millions of people, mientras las tropas leales al Libro Rojo del Presidente destrozaban reliquias y templos y castigaban a los supuestos traidores. Cuando la Revolución Cultural finalmente se agotó una década después, más de un millón de personas habían sido asesinadas. ____________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #China #Mao Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Muhammad Ali contra Sonny Liston. Neil Leifer, 1965 Gran parte del secreto de una buena foto es estar en el lugar y momento adecuados. Esta suerte tuvo Neil Leifer cuando disparó la fotografía deportiva más célebre del S.XX. “Obviamente estaba en el asiento correcto, pero lo que importa es que no fallé”, dijo más tarde. The 25 May 1965, Leifer ocupó ese asiento en el ring de Lewiston, Maine, cuando el campeón de boxeo de peso pesado de 23 años de edad, Muhammad Ali, se enfrentó a Sonny Liston, of the 34 años de edad, el hombre al que había arrebatado el título del año anterior. Un minuto y 44 segundos después del primer asalto, el puño derecho de Ali conectó con la barbilla de Liston y Liston cayó a plomo. Leifer sacó la foto del campeón sobresaliendo sobre su oponente vencido y burlándose de él, “¡Levántate y pelea, imbécil!” Las potentes luces de techo y las nubes de humo de los cigarros habían convertido el ring en el estudio perfecto, y Leifer se aprovechó al máximo. Su imagen captura a Ali irradiando la fuerza y el descaro poético que lo convirtió en el atleta más amado y vilipendiado de la Estados Unidos, en un momento en que el deporte, la política y la cultura popular estaban en la cuerda floja en plena revolución social y cultural de los años 60. ____________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #muhammadali #ring Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Birmingham, Alabama. Charles Moore, 1963 Sometimes the most effective mirror of reality is a photograph. En el verano de 1963, Birmingham estaba en ebullición cuando los ciudadanos negros y sus aliados en el movimiento de derechos civiles chocaron repetidamente con una estructura de poder blanca que intentaba mantener la segregación y que estaba dispuesta a hacer lo que fuera necesario. Charles Moore era fotógrafo del Montgomery Advertiser y de Life, nacido en Alabama e hijo de un predicador bautista horrorizado por la violencia infligida a los afroamericanos en nombre de la ley y el orden. Aunque fotografió muchos otros momentos importantes del movimiento, fue esta imagen de un perro policía rasgando los pantalones de un manifestante negro lo que capturó la rutina, incluso casual, de la brutalidad de la segregación. Cuando la imagen se publicó en Life, rápidamente se hizo evidente para el resto del mundo lo que Moore había sabido durante mucho tiempo: poner fin a la segregación no se trataba de erosionar la cultura, sino de restaurar la humanidad. Los políticos vacilantes pronto tomaron cartas en el asunto y aprobaron la Ley de Derechos Civiles de 1964 casi un año después. ____________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #civilrights #segregation Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Nuit de Noël (Happy Club). Malick Sidibé, 1963 La vida del fotógrafo maliense Malick Sidibé siguió los pasos de la de su país. Comenzó pastoreando las cabras de su familia y luego se formó en joyería, pintura y fotografía. At the end of French colonial rule in 1960, capturó los sutiles y profundos cambios que estaban dando forma a su país. Dubbed the Ojo de Bamako, Sidibé tomó miles de fotos que se convirtieron en una crónica en tiempo real del eufórico espíritu del tiempo que se apoderó de la capital, un documento de un momento fugaz. “Todo el mundo tenía que ir al último estilo parisino”, observó de los jóvenes que llevaban ropa llamativa, a horcajadas en Vespas y acariciando en público mientras abrazaban un mundo sin grilletes. En la Nochebuena de 1963, Sidibé se encontró con una joven pareja en un club, perdida en los ojos del otro. Lo que Sidibé llamó sutalento para observarle permitió capturar su tranquila intimidad, con las cabezas rascándose mientras adornaban una pista de baile vacía. “Estábamos entrando en una nueva era, y la gente quería bailar”, dijo Sidibé. “La música nos liberó. Suddenly, los hombres jóvenes podían acercarse a las mujeres jóvenes, sostenerlas en sus manos. Before, no estaba permitido. Y todos querían ser fotografiados bailando de cerca”. ____________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #mali #dance Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Salto a la libertad. Peter Leibing, 1961 Después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, los gobiernos aliados conquistadores dividieron Berlín en cuatro zonas de ocupación. However, todas las partes no eran iguales, y entre 1949 And 1961 A 2,5 millones de alemanes orientales huyeron de la sección soviética en busca de libertad. Para detener el flujo, el líder de Alemania Oriental, Walter Ulbricht, hizo levantar a principios de agosto de 1961 una barrera de alambre de púas. A few days later, el fotógrafo de Associated Press, Peter Leibing, fue informado de que podría producirse una deserción. Él y otros cámaras se reunieron y observaron a una multitud en Berlín Occidental que atrajo al guardia fronterizo de 19 años Hans Conrad Schumann, gritándole: “¡Ven aquí!” Schumann, que más tarde dijo que no queríavivir encerrado”, de repente corrió hacia la barricada. Mientras despejaba los cables afilados, dejó caer su rifle y se lo llevaron. Enviada a través del cable de AP, la foto de Leibing apareció en las primeras planas de todo el mundo. Hizo de Schumann, supuestamente el primer soldado conocido de Alemania Oriental que huyó, un ejemplo de los que anhelan ser libres, al tiempo que daba urgencia a Alemania Oriental por un Muro de Berlín más permanente. Schumann sintió el peso de su decisión y finalmente se suicidó en 1998. ____________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #berlin #freedom Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Case Study House no. 22, Los Angeles. Julius Shulman, 1960 Durante décadas, el Sueño de California significó la oportunidad de tener una casa en medio de un paraíso. El atractivo de la casa era el patio con las palmeras, no el contorno de las paredes. Julius Shulman ayudó a cambiar eso. In May 1960, el fotógrafo nacido en Brooklyn se dirigió a la Stahl House del arquitecto Pierre Koenig, una casa de Hollywood Hills con una vista impresionante de Los Ángeles, una de las 36 Casas del proyecto “Case Study Houses” que fueron parte de un experimento arquitectónico que ensalzaba las virtudes de la teoría modernista y los materiales industriales. Shulman fotografió la mayoría de las casas del proyecto, ayudando a desmitificar el modernismo al resaltar su elegante simplicidad y humanizar sus bordes angulares. Pero ninguna de sus otras fotos fue más influyente que la que tomó de la Case Study House no. 22. Para mostrar la esencia de este edificio en voladizo, Shulman colocó a dos glamorosas mujeres en vestidas de cóctel dentro de la casa, donde parecen estar flotando sobre una ciudad mítica y centelleante. La foto, para éluna de mis obras maestras”, es la imagen inmobiliaria de mayor éxito jamás tomada. Perfeccionó el arte de la puesta en escena aspiracional, convirtiendo una casa en la encarnación de la Buena Vida, de Hollywood, de California como la Tierra Prometida. And, gracias a Shulman, ese sueño ahora incluye una caja de vidrio en el cielo ____________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #hollywood #americandream Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Guerillero. Alberto Repeat, 1960 El día antes de que Alberto Korda tomara su icónica fotografía del revolucionario cubano Che Guevara, un barco había explotado en el puerto de La Habana, matando a la tripulación y a decenas de trabajadores portuarios. By covering the funeral of Revolution, Korda se centró en Fidel Castro, quien en una ardiente oración acusó a Estados Unidos de causar la explosión. Los dos fotogramas que filmó del joven aliado de Castro fueron una ocurrencia tardía, y no fueron publicados por el periódico. Pero después de que Guevara fuera asesinado dirigiendo un movimiento guerrillero en Bolivia casi siete años después, el régimen cubano lo abrazó como un mártir del movimiento, y la imagen de Korda del revolucionario vestido con boina pronto se convirtió en su símbolo más perdurable. En poco tiempo, “Guerrillero” fue apropiado por artistas, causas y admiradores de todo el mundo, apareciendo en todo, desde arte de protesta hasta ropa interior y refrescos. Se ha convertido en la abreviatura cultural de la rebelión y en una de las imágenes más reconocibles y reproducidas de todos los tiempos, con su influencia desde hace mucho tiempo más allá de sus ojos de acero. ____________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #che #guerrilla Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Milk Drop Coronet. Harold Edgerton, 1957 Before Harold Edgerton put a dropper of milk with a timer and a camera of his own invention, era virtualmente imposible tomar una buena foto en la oscuridad sin un equipo voluminoso. Fue igualmente inútil intentar fotografiar un momento fugaz. Pero en la década de 1950, en su laboratorio del MIT, Edgerton comenzó a jugar con un proceso que cambiaría el futuro de la fotografía. There, el profesor de ingeniería electrónica combinó luces estroboscópicas de alta tecnología con motores de obturadores de cámara para capturar momentos imperceptibles a simple vista. Milk Drop Coronet, su revolucionaria fotografía de stop-motion, congela el impacto de una gota de leche sobre una mesa, una corona de líquido perceptible por la cámara durante sólo un milisegundo. La fotografía demostró que la fotografía podía hacer avanzar la comprensión humana del mundo físico, y la tecnología que Edgerton usó para tomarla sentó las bases para el flash electrónico moderno. Edgerton trabajó durante años para perfeccionar sus fotografías de gotas de leche, muchas de ellas en blanco y negro; una de ellas fue presentada en la primera exposición de fotografía en el Museo de Arte Moderno de la ciudad de Nueva York, In 1937. Y mientras que el hombre conocido como Doc capturó otros momentos, como la explosión de globos y la perforación de una manzana con una bala, su gota de leche sigue siendo un ejemplo por excelencia de la capacidad de la fotografía para hacer arte a partir de las pruebas. ____________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #milkdrop #coronet Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Dovima with elephants, evening dress by Dior, Cirque d’Hiver, Paris. Richard Avedon, 1955 Cuando Richard Avedon fotografió a Dovima en un circo de París en 1955 para Harper’s Bazaar, ambos ya eran referentes en sus campos. Ella era una de las modelos más famosas del mundo, y él era uno de los fotógrafos de moda más famosos. It makes sense, entonces, que Dovima With Elephants sea una de las fotografías de moda más famosas de todos los tiempos. Pero su influencia perdurable reside tanto en lo que captura como en las dos personas que lo hicieron. Dovima fue una de las últimas grandes modelos, cuando la alta costura era un mundo relativamente exclusivo y elitista. Después de la década de 1950, las modelos empezaron a orbitar hacia los looks de las chicas corrientes en lugar de la belleza inalcanzable de la vieja generación, ayudando a convertir la alta costura en entretenimiento. Dovima With Elephants destila ese cambio yuxtaponiendo el espectáculo y la fuerza de los elefantes con la belleza de Dovima y la delicadeza de su vestido, que fue el primer vestido de Dior diseñado por Yves Saint Laurent. La imagen también aporta movimiento a un medio que antes estaba caracterizado por la quietud. Las modelos habían sido durante mucho tiempo maniquíes, destinadas a permanecer inmóviles mientras los vestidos recibían toda la atención. Avedon vio lo que estaba mal en esa ecuación: el vestido no sólo hacía a la persona; la persona también hacía el vestido. Y al sacar a las modelos del estudio y colocarlas en un escenario especial, ayudó a desdibujar la línea entre la fotografía de moda comercial y el arte. In this way, Dovima With Elephants captura un punto de inflexión en nuestra cultura más amplia: la última top model de estilo antiguo, presentando la moda de una nueva forma. _________________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #avedon #fashion Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Trolley-New Orleans. Robert Frank, 1955 . Las verdades incómodas tienden a tener consecuencias para quien las cuenta. Cuando se publicó el libro de Robert Frank The Americans, la revista Practical Photography desestimó el trabajo del fotógrafo suizo como una colección dedesenfoques, granos, exposiciones turbias, horizontes de borrachera y descuidos en general”. The 83 imágenes del libro fueron tomadas mientras Frank atravesaba los Estados Unidos en varios viajes por carretera a mediados de la década de 1950, y capturaron un país en la cúspide del cambio: rígidamente segregado pero con el movimiento de los derechos civiles en movimiento, arraigado en la tradición familiar y rural, pero moviéndose de cabeza en el anonimato de la vida urbana. En ninguna parte esta tensión es mayor que en Trolley-New Orleans, un momento fugaz que transmite el brutal orden social de la América de la posguerra. La foto, tomada unas semanas antes de que Rosa Parks se negara a ceder su asiento en un autobús en Montgomery, Alabama, no fue planeada. Frank estaba haciendo un desfile callejero cuando vio pasar el tranvía. Girando alrededor, Frank levantó su cámara y disparó justo antes de que el carrito desapareciera de la vista. La foto fue utilizada en la portada de las primeras ediciones de The Americans, alimentando la crítica de que el trabajo era antiamericano. Of course, Frank -que se hizo ciudadano estadounidense en 1963, cinco años después de la publicación de The Americans- simplemente vio a su país adoptivo como era, no como se imaginaba ser. Medio siglo después, esa franqueza ha hecho de The Americans un monumento a la fotografía documental y callejera. El estilo suelto y subjetivo de Frank liberó la forma de las convenciones del fotoperiodismo establecidas por la revista Life, que él descartó comomalditas historias con un principio y un final”. _________________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #segregation #racism Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Camelot. Hy Peskin, 1953 Before they could become the "jet", Estados Unidos necesitaba dar a conocer a John Fitzgerald Kennedy y Jacqueline Lee Bouvier. Esa presentación llegó cuando Hy Peskin fotografió al apuesto político y a su radiante prometida durante un fin de semana de verano en 1953. Peskin, un reconocido fotógrafo deportivo, se dirigió al puerto de Hyannis, Massachusetts, por invitación del patriarca familiar Joseph Kennedy. El embajador, deseoso de que su hijo ascendiera como figura nacional, pensó que un artículo en las páginas de LIFE fomentaría la fascinación por John, su hermosa novia y una de las familias más ricas de Estados Unidos. Y eso fue exactamente lo que hizo. Peskin creó una serie fotografías estilo “un día en la vida de” tituladaEl senador Kennedy sale de cortejo”. Mientras Jackie se enfurecía por la intrusión -la madre de John, Rose, incluso le dijo cómo posar-, ella estuvo de acuerdo con la puesta en escena, y los lectores pudieron observar a Jackie despeinando alhombre más guapo y joven del Senado de los Estados Unidos”, jugando fútbol y softball con sus futuros suegros, y navegando a bordo del barco de John, Victura. “Me metieron en ese barco lo suficiente como para salir en la foto”, le confió más tarde a una amiga. Fue una fotografía perfecta, con Kennedy en la portada de la revista de fotografía más leída del mundo, interpretada como un playboy seguro de sí mismo preparado para decir adiós a la soltería. Unos meses más tarde Life cubriría la boda de la pareja, y para entonces América ya estaba cautivada. En esos tiempos de Eisenhower y Nixon, Peskin reveló el rostro de Camelot, uno que cambió la percepción de la política y de los políticos de Estados Unidos, e hizo que John y Jackie se convirtieran en la pareja más famosa del planeta. _________________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #jackie #jfk Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Country Doctor. W. Eugene Smith, 1948 Despite being known for his war photography, W. Eugene Smith dejó su marca personal con una serie de ensayos fotográficos a mediados del siglo pasado para la revista LIFE. El fotógrafo, nacido en Wichita, Kansas, pasó semanas sumergiéndose en la vida de sus pacientes, desde una enfermera-matrona de Carolina del Sur hasta los residentes de un pueblo español. Su objetivo era ver el mundo desde la perspectiva de sus pacientes y obligar a los espectadores a hacer lo mismo. “No busco poseer a mi paciente, sino entregarme a él”, dijo sobre su enfoque. Eso quedó genialmentre plasmado en su ensayo fotográficoCountry Doctor”. Smith pasó 23 días con el Dr. Ernest Ceriani alrededor de Kremmling, Colorado, siguiendo al médico a través de la comunidad ganadera de 2.000 almas bajo las Montañas Rocosas. Lo vio atender a bebés, poner inyecciones en los asientos traseros de vehículos, desarrollar sus propias radiografías, tratar a un hombre con un ataque al corazón y luego llamar a un sacerdote para darle los últimos ritos. Escarbando tan profundamente en su tarea, Smith creó una visión singular, totalmente íntima, de la vida de un hombre extraordinario. Se convirtió no sólo en el ensayo fotográfico más influyente de la historia, sino también en modelo a seguir. _________________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #doctor #life Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Dalí Atomicus, Philippe Halsman, 1948 El propósito vital de Philippe Halsman fue capturar la esencia de lo que fotografiaba. So when I set out to do the surrealist painter Salvador Dalí, su amigo y colaborador de toda la vida, intuyó que un retrato corriente no sería adecuado. Inspirado en la pintura de Dalí Leda Atomica, Halsman creó una elaborada escena para rodear al artista que incluía la obra original, una silla flotante y un caballete en proceso suspendido por finos alambres. Los ayudantes, entre los que se encontraban la esposa de Halsman y su hija pequeña Irene, saltaron del marco y arrojaron tres gatos y un cubo de agua al aire mientras Dalí saltaba. Fueron necesarias 26 tomas para capturar la composición. Y no es de extrañar. El resultado final, publicado en LIFE, evoca la obra de Dalí. El artista incluso pintó una imagen directamente sobre la impresión antes de su publicación. Before Halsman, la fotografía de retrato era a menudo de tipo zigzag y suavemente borrosa, con una clara sensación de distancia entre el fotógrafo y el sujeto. El enfoque de Halsman, retratando a famosos como Albert Einstein, Marilyn Monroe y Alfred Hitchcock mientras se movían ante la cámara, redefinió la fotografía de retrato e inspiró a generaciones de fotógrafos a colaborar con sus sujetos. _________________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #dali #surrealism Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Gandhi y la rueca. Margaret Bourke-Blanco, 1946 Cuando los británicos tuvieron a Mohandas Gandhi en la prisión de Yeravda en Pune, India, of the 1932 To 1933, el líder nacionalista hizo su propio hilo con una charkha, una rueca portátil. La práctica evolucionó desde un interés personal durante el cautiverio hasta convertirse en piedra de toque de la campaña por la independencia, con Gandhi animando a sus compatriotas a hacer sus propias telas caseras en lugar de comprar productos británicos. Cuando Margaret Bourke-White llegó al recinto de Gandhi para leer un artículo de Life sobre los líderes de la India, la rueca estaba tan ligada a la identidad de Gandhi que su secretaria, Pyarelal Nayyar, le dijo a Bourke-White que tenía que aprender el oficio antes de fotografiar al líder. La foto de Bourke-White de Gandhi leyendo las noticias junto a su charkha nunca apareció en el artículo para el que fue tomada, pero menos de dos años después Life mostraba la foto de manera prominente en un obituario publicado después del asesinato de Gandhi. Pronto se convirtió en una imagen eterna, el mártir de la desobediencia civil con su símbolo más potente, y ayudó a solidificar la percepción de Gandhi fuera de India como un santo hombre de paz. _________________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #gandhi #civilrights Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Día de la Victoria en Times Square. Alfred Eisenstaedt, 1945 La fotografía captura fragmentos fugaces que cristalizan la esperanza, la angustia, la maravilla y la alegría de vivir. Alfred Eisenstaedt, uno de los cuatro primeros fotógrafos contratados por la revista LIFE, hizo de su misiónencontrar y captar el momento de contar historias”. No tuvo que ir muy lejos cuando la Segunda Guerra Mundial terminó el 14 de agosto de 1945. Tomando el ambiente en las calles de la ciudad de Nueva York, Eisenstaedt pronto se encontró en el alegre tumulto de Times Square. Mientras buscaba temas, un marinero frente a él agarró a una enfermera, la inclinó hacia atrás y la besó. La fotografía de Eisenstaedt de esa bajada apasionada destila el alivio y la promesa de ese día trascendental en un solo momento de alegría desenfrenada (aunque algunos argumentan hoy que debería ser visto como un caso de agresión sexual). Su bella imagen se ha convertido en el cuadro más famoso y reproducido con frecuencia del siglo XX, y constituye la base de nuestra memoria colectiva de ese momento transformador de la historia mundial. Eisenstaedt dijo “La gente me dice que cuando esté en el cielo recordarán esta foto”. _________________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #thekiss #timessquare Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

The critic. Weegee, 1943 Arthur Fellig had a sour view of the unfairness of life. Un inmigrante austríaco que creció en las fanganosas calles del Lower East Side de la ciudad de Nueva York, Fellig se dio a conocer como Weegee -una versión fonética de Ouija- por su habilidad innata para tomar la foto perfecta. Often these were images of crimes, tragedias y de los habitantes de la Nueva York noctámbula. In 1943, Weegee puso el flash cegador de su cámara Speed Graphic sobre las desigualdades sociales y económicas que persistían después de la Gran Depresión. Envió a su ayudante, Louie Liotta, a un antro de Bowery en busca de una mujer borracha. Encontró a una dispuesta y la llevó al Metropolitan Opera House. Luego Liotta la instaló cerca de la entrada mientras Weegee esperaba la llegada de la Sra. Washington Kavanaugh y Lady Decies, dos mujeres adineradas que frecuentaban las columnas de sociedad. Cuando la gente de la calle llegó a la ópera, Weegee le dio la señal a Liotta para que soltara a la mujer borracha. “Fue como una explosión”, recordó Liotta. “Pensé que me quedé ciego por las tres o cuatro exposiciones del flash.Con ese destello, Weegee capturó la cruda yuxtaposición de fabulosa riqueza y pobreza extrema, en un estilo que anticipó el atractivo comercial de los paparazzi décadas después. La foto apareció en Life bajo el títuloThe Fashionable People” (La gente a la moda), y la pieza permitía a los lectores saber cómo la “Input” de las mujeres era vista con disgusto por un espectador. El hecho de que más tarde se revelara que The Critic había sido un montaje planificado no contribuyó a atenuar su influencia. _________________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #weegee #richandpoor Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Betty Grable. Frank Powolny, 1943 Helena de Troya, la mítica semidiosa griega que desencadenó la Guerra de Troya, no tenía nada que ver con Betty Grable de St. Louis. Esta estrella de Hollywood, rubia platino y de ojos azules, tenía unas piernas que inspiraban a soldados, marineros, aviadores y marines estadounidenses para salvar a la civilización de los países del eje del mal. Y a diferencia de Helena de Troya, Betty representaba a una chica de carne y hueso manteniendo el fuego encendido del hogar. Frank Powolny trajo a Betty a las tropas por accidente. Fotógrafo de 20th Century Fox, estaba tomando fotos publicitarias de la actriz de la película de 1943 Sweet Rosie O’Grady cuando aceptó un retrato trasero. El estudio convirtió esta pose en una de los primeras pinups, y pronto las tropas solicitaron 50.000 copias cada mes. Los hombres llevaron a Betty a dondequiera que iban, pegando su póster en las paredes de los barracones, pintándola en fuselajes de bombarderos y colocando copias de ella al lado de sus corazones. Before Marilyn Monroe, la sonrisa y las piernas de Betty -dijo estar asegurada por un millón de dólares con Lloyd’s de Londres- congregaron a un sinnúmero de jóvenes con morriña en la lucha de sus vidas (incluyendo a un joven Hugh Hefner, quien la citó como una inspiración para Playboy). “Tengo que ser la hija de un soldado”, dijo Grable, que firmó cientos de sus pinups cada mes durante la guerra. “And this has to be a war of soldiers.” _________________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #pinups #BettyGrable Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Einstein tongue. Arthur Sasse, 1951 Para el rotativo The Guardian, This “posiblemente es una de las fotografías de prensa más conocidas de cualquier personalidad del siglo XXfue tomada el 14 March 1951, el día del cumpleaños de Albert Einstein. El científico estaba saliendo de su fiesta de su 72 aniversario en la Universidad de Princeton, que había estado plagada de fotógrafos, y estaba comprensiblemente cansado de sonreír toda la noche. Cuando abandonó el evento y se subió al asiento trasero de un coche entre el Dr. Frank Aydelotte and his wife Marie Jeanette, otra multitud de reporteros y fotógrafos avanzó. Einstein no estaba de humor para seguir sonriendo. Según la leyenda, gritó: ¡Basta ya! Pero no le escucharon. Por exasperacióny tal vez un poco de rencorEinstein sacó la lengua a la multitud, y luego se volvió inmediatamente. Arthur Sasse UPI was lucky to capture split-second shot. Einstein loved Sasse took the picture and asked UPI nine copies that used as personal greeting cards. La mayoría de ellas fueron recortadas para incluir sólo su rostro, creando la imagen icónica que todos conocemos hoy en día. Una copia, However, permaneció tal cual, y la firmó para un reportero. In 2017, esa foto se vendió en una subasta por la friolera de 125.000 Dollars. ______________________ #bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #einstein #tongue Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Migrant mother. Dorothea Lange, 1936 La frase favorita de la fotógrafa documental Dorothea Lange eraUna cámara es una herramienta para aprender a ver sin una cámara”. Y quizás nadie hizo más para revelar las consecuencias de la Gran Depresión que Lange, que nació en 1895. Sus fotografías aportaron una mirada inquietante -y profundamente humana- a las luchas de los agricultores desplazados, los trabajadores migrantes, los aparceros y otros en el fondo de la economía agrícola estadounidense a medida que se tambaleaba a lo largo de la década de 1930. Su foto más famosa esMadre Migrante”. Tomada en 1936 en un campamento lleno de recolectores de guisantes desempleados en Nipomo, California, la imagen muestra a Florence Owen Thompson, una trabajadora agrícola flanqueada por dos de sus siete hijos, mientras que un tercero, un bebé envuelto en arpillera, descansa sobre su regazo. La lluvia helada había destruido el cultivo de guisantes. Thompson y sus hijos habían estado viviendo de comer verduras congeladas de los campos circundantes, y de aves que los niños mataban. Según Lange, acababa de vender los neumáticos de su coche para comprar comida. ___________________ #bestphotosever #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #hunger #humanity Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Winston Churchill. Yousuf Karsh, 1941 Gran Bretaña se sentía sola en 1941. Para entonces Polonia, Francia y gran parte de Europa habían caído en manos de las fuerzas nazis, y sólo los pequeños pilotos, soldados y marineros de la nación, junto con los de la Commonwealth, se mantenían en la oscuridad. Winston Churchill estaba decidido a que la luz de Inglaterra continuara brillando. In December 1941, poco después de que los japoneses atacaran Pearl Harbor y Estados Unidos fuera arrastrado a la guerra, Churchill visitó el Parlamento en Ottawa para agradecer a Canadá y a los Aliados por su ayuda. Churchill no sabía que Yousuf Karsh había sido el encargado de hacer su retrato después, y cuando salió y vio al fotógrafo canadiense nacido en Turquía, exigió saber: “¿Por qué no se me dijo?” Churchill encendió un cigarro, lo sopló y le dijo al fotógrafo: “Puedes tomar uno”. Mientras Karsh se preparaba, Churchill se negó a dejar el cigarro. So once Karsh made sure everything was ready, se acercó al Primer Ministro y le dijo: “Perdóneme, señor”, y le arrancó el puro de la boca a Churchill. “Para cuando volví a mi cámara, parecía tan beligerante que podría haberme devorado. Fue en ese instante cuando tomé la fotografía”. Siempre diplomático, Churchill sonrió y dijo: “Puedes tomar otroy estrechó la mano de Karsh, diciéndole: “Hasta puedes hacer que un león rugiente se quede quieto para ser fotografiado”. El resultado de la “doma del león” de Karsh es una de las imágenes más ampliamente reproducidas en la historia y un hito en el arte del retrato político. Fue la foto de Karsh Churchill con cara de Bulldog -publicada primero en el diario estadounidense PM y finalmente en la portada de LIFE- la que dio el pistoletazo de salida a los fotógrafos modernos para hacer retratos honestos, incluso críticos, de nuestros líderes. ______________________ #bestphotosever #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #churchill #portrait Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

The Hindenburg disaster. Sam Shere, 1937 Los zepelines eran naves majestuosas, lujosos gigantes signo de riqueza y poder. La llegada de estas naves fue noticia, por lo que Sam Shere, del servicio International News Photos, esperaba bajo la lluvia en la estación aérea naval de Lakehurst, Nueva Jersey, The 6 May 1937, a que la LZ 129 Hindenburg, of the 804 pies de largo, llegara de Frankfurt. Suddenly, mientras los medios de comunicación reunidos observaban, el hidrógeno inflamable de la gran nave se incendió, haciendo que estallara espectacularmente en llamas amarillas brillantes y matara a 36 People. Shere era uno de las casi dos docenas de fotógrafos de prensa que se apresuraron a documentar la rápida tragedia. Pero es su imagen, con su cruda inmediatez y su horrible grandeza, la que ha perdurado como la más famosa, gracias a su publicación en portadas de todo el mundo y en LIFE y, más de tres décadas después, a su uso en la portada del primer álbum de Led Zeppelin. El accidente contribuyó a cerrar la era de las aeronaves, y la poderosa fotografía de Shere de uno de los primeros desastres aéreos más espectaculares del mundo persiste como un recordatorio cautelar de cómo errores humanos pueden llevar a la muerte y a la destrucción. Casi tan famosa como la foto de Shere es la voz angustiada del locutor de radio de Chicago Herbert Morrison, que lloraba mientras veía a la gente caer en el aire: “Está ardiendo en llamas….”. Esto es terrible. Esta es una de las peores catástrofes del mundo…. ¡Oh, humanity!” ________________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #zeppelin #Hindenburg Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

The Loch Ness Monster. Fotógrafo desconocido, 1934 Si la jirafa no existiera, tendríamos que inventarla. Es nuestra naturaleza aburrirnos con lo improbable pero real y buscar lo imposible. Lo mismo sucede con la foto del monstruo del Lago Ness, supuestamente tomada por el médico británico Robert Wilson en abril de 1934. Wilson, However, simplemente había sido reclutado para encubrir un fraude anterior por el cazador de juegos salvajes Marmaduke Wetherell, quien había sido enviado a Escocia por el Daily Mail de Londres para atrapar al monstruo. With no monster to discover, Wetherell trajo a casa fotos de huellas de hipopótamos que, según él, pertenecían a Nessie. El diario Mail atrapó al sabio y desacreditado Wetherell, quien luego regresó al lago con un monstruo hecho de un submarino de juguete. Él y su hijo usaron a Wilson, un médico respetado, para darle credibilidad al engaño. El Mail perdura; la reputación de Wilson no. La imagen del Lago Ness es una especie de piedra angular para los teóricos de la conspiración y los buscadores de fábulas, al igual que la imagen absolutamente auténtica de la famosa cara en Marte tomada por la sonda Viking en 1976. La emoción de ese hallazgo duró sólo hasta 1998, cuando el Mars Global Surveyor demostró que la cara era, como dijo la NASA, una formación topográfica, una que en ese momento había sido casi arrastrada por el viento. Éramos inocentes en esos dulces días anteriores al Photoshop. now we investigate, y somos más desconfiados. El arte de la falsificación ha avanzado, pero su encanto, como el de la cara de Marte, ha desaparecido. ________________________ #time100bestphotos #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #LochNess #Nessie Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

La chica afgana. Steve McCurry, 1984 Steve McCurry es un fotoperiodista estadounidense que ha trabajado para National Geographic y ha ganado innumerables premios por la cobertura de varias guerras a lo largo de la historia. Pero solo una de sus imágenes ha merecido una página en Wikipedia. Su portada de National Geographic es la imagen es de una adolescente de ojos verdes con pañuelo rojo mirando intensamente a la cámara. Su identidad no se conocía inicialmente, pero a principios de 2002 fue identificada como Sharbat Gula. Era una niña afgana que vivía en el campo de refugiados de Nasir Bagh en Pakistán durante la época de la ocupación soviética de Afganistán cuando fue fotografiada. Los padres de Gula murieron durante el bombardeo de la Unión Soviética en Afganistán cuando ella tenía unos seis años en su aldea en el este de Nangarhar. The 26 October 2016, Gula y sus tres hijos fueron detenidos en Pakistán por la Agencia Federal de Investigación por vivir en el país utilizando documentos falsos. Fue sentenciada a quince días de detención y deportada a Afganistán. La decisión fue criticada por Amnistía Internacional. En Kabul, Gula y sus hijos fueron recibidos por el Presidente Ashraf Ghani en el palacio presidencial. El gobierno prometió apoyarla financieramente, y en diciembre de 2017, Gula recibió una residencia en Kabul para que ella y sus hijos pudieran vivir en ella. Posiblemente nunca hubiera recibido esa ayuda sin esa fotografía y ese relato que agitó conciencias en todo el mundo. Se ha comparado esta imagen con el cuadro de Leonardo da Vinci de la Mona Lisa y se ha llamadola primera Mona Lisa del Tercer Mundo”. La imagen se ha convertido en emblemática de una persona refugiada ubicada en algún campo lejano, merecedora de la atención y compasión de quien observe la imagen. ________________________ #bestphotosever #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #afghangirl #refugee Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

The Suffering of light. Alex Webb, 1979 Como una obra de Dalí, contemplar esta fotografía de lejos o de cerca nos ofrece realidades distintas. De lejos, es una imagen idílica de lo que podría ser una familia de agricultores en un campo. De cerca, vemos a un grupo de ciudadanos mexicanos arrestados mientras intentaban cruzar la frontera con Estados Unidos en San Ysidro, California, Usa. U.S.. The Suffering of light (El sufrimiento de la luz) es un libro, la primera monografía completa que traza la carrera del aclamado fotógrafo estadounidense Alex Webb. Reuniendo algunas de sus imágenes más icónicas, muchas de las cuales fueron tomadas en los rincones más lejanos de la tierra. ________________________ #bestphotosever #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #inmigration #borders Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Lunch Atop a Skyscraper. Fotógrafo desconocido, 1932 Es la pausa para el almuerzo más peligrosa y juguetona que jamás se haya capturado: 11 hombres comiendo, charlando y fumando a escondidas como si no estuvieran a 250 metros por encima de Manhattan con nada más que una viga delgada manteniéndolos en lo alto. Esa comodidad es real; eran los trabajadores de la construcción que ayudaron a construir el Rockefeller Center. Pero la foto, tomada en el piso 69 del edificio insignia de la RCA (ahora el edificio GE), fue puesta en escena como parte de una campaña promocional para el enorme complejo de rascacielos. Mientras que el fotógrafo y las identidades de la mayoría de los sujetos siguen siendo un misterio -los fotógrafos Charles C. Ebbets, Thomas Kelley y William Leftwich estuvieron todos presentes ese día, y no se sabe quién los tomó-, no hay un ferretero en la ciudad de Nueva York que no vea la foto como una insignia de su audaz tribu. De esa manera no están solos. By mocking both the danger and depression, “Lunch Atop a Skyscraper” se convirtió en un símbolo de la resistencia y la ambición estadounidenses en un momento en el que ambos eran desesperadamente necesarios. Desde entonces se ha convertido en un emblema icónico de la ciudad en la que fue tomada, afirmando la creencia romántica de que Nueva York es un lugar sin miedo a abordar proyectos que acobardarían a las ciudades menos descaradas. Y como todos los símbolos de una ciudad construida sobre el ajetreo, “Lunch Atop a Skyscraper” ha generado su propia economía. Es la imagen más reproducida de la agencia fotográfica Corbis. ________________________ #bestphotosever #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #lunch #rca Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Signals. John Stanmeyer, 2014 Emigrantes africanos en la costa de la ciudad de Djibouti levantan sus teléfonos por la noche en un intento de captar señal de la vecina Somalia, un tenue vínculo con familiares en el extranjero. Esta foto de John Stanmeyer, nacido en Illinois, miembro fundador de la VII agencia de fotografía, ganó el premio World Press Photo of the Year 2014. Es una escena que literalmente no pudo haber ocurrido hace unos años; una luna brillante ilumina a los sujetos que intentan establecer contacto inalámbrico con familiares en el extranjero. “Es una foto que está relacionada con tantas otras historias”, dijo Jillian Edelstein, miembro del jurado y fotógrafa de World Press Photo. “Opens debate on technology, Globalization, migración, pobreza, desesperación, alienación, humanidad.Stanmeyer ha recibido numerosos honores, incluyendo el prestigioso premio Robert Capa (Overseas Press Club), Fotografo del Año (POYi), y numerosos premios de la Prensa Mundial, Picture of the Year y NPPA. In 2008, su reportaje de National Geographic sobre la malaria mundial recibió el premio National Magazine Award, and in 2012 fue nominado para un Emmy con la VII serie de documentales, “Hambrientos de atención”. ________________________ #bestphotosever #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #worldpressphoto #signal Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Behind the Gare Saint-Lazare. Henri Cartier-Bresson, 1932 La velocidad y el instinto estaban en el corazón de la brillantez de Henri Cartier-Bresson como fotógrafo. Y nunca los combinó mejor que el día en que, In 1932, apuntó con su cámara Leica a través de una valla detrás de la estación de tren de Saint-Lazare en París. La imagen resultante es una obra maestra de forma y luz. Mientras un hombre salta sobre el agua, evocando a los bailarines en un cartel en la pared detrás de él, las ondas en el charco alrededor de la escalera imitan las piezas de metal curvadas cercanas. Cartier-Bresson, disparando con una ágil cámara de 35 milímetros y sin flash, vio que todos estos componentes se unían durante un breve momento y presionó su obturador. El tiempo lo es todo, y ningún otro fotógrafo entendía tan bien esa idea. La imagen se convertiría en el ejemplo por excelencia delMomento decisivode Cartier-Bresson, su término lírico para la capacidad de inmortalizar una escena fugaz en el cine. Era un estilo rápido, móvil, obsesionado con los detalles que ayudaría a trazar el rumbo de toda la fotografía moderna. ________________________ #bestphotosever #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #speed #moment Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

An Antarctic Advantage. Daniel Berehulak, 2015 El Dr. Ernesto Molina, apoyado por el Instituto Antártico Chileno, camina por la base antártica rusa de Bellingshausen, con su Iglesia Ortodoxa de la Santísima Trinidad, en la Bahía de Fildes. Varios países, entre ellos Chile, Polonia y Rusia, han establecido estaciones científicas en la isla Rey Jorge en la Antártida. Por el Tratado Antártico, que entró en vigor en 1961, la Antártida se dejó de lado como reserva científica, con libertad de investigación y libre intercambio intelectual. Ningún país puede explotar los recursos minerales ni ejercer pretensiones territoriales. El tratado está actualmente en vigor hasta 2048, pero algunos países tienen la intención de ejercer una mayor influencia antes de la fecha de renovación. Some are looking at the strategic and commercial opportunities exist today, como la recolección de iceberg (se estima que la Antártida tiene las mayores reservas de agua dulce del planeta), la pesca de krill y la expansión de la capacidad de navegación global. Esta fotografía del australiano Daniel Berehulak (New York Times) logró el 1er premio en historias de la vida diaria del World Press Photo 2016 ________________________ #bestphotosever #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #antarctic #worldpressphoto Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

La Haya. Erich Salomon, 1930 Varios ministros se reúnen para decidir el destino de las naciones con evidentes señales de cansancio, entre cigarros y brandy. Este tipo de situaciones siempre habían permanecido ocultas a miradas indiscretas. El fotoperiodista alemán Erich Salomon puso fin a esa discreción, moviéndose entre salas cargadas de humo con una pequeña cámara Leica construida para disparar con poca luz. En ningún otro lugar exhibió tanto su habilidad como en una reunión de 1930 en La Haya sobre las compensaciones de Alemania por los daños causados en la Primera Guerra Mundial. There, a las dos de la madrugada, la cámara de Salomon captó fielmente a los exhaustos Ministros de Asuntos Exteriores después de un largo día de negociaciones. La imagen causó sensación cuando fue publicada en el London Graphic. For the first time, el público podía mirar a través de la mirilla del poder y ver a los líderes mundiales con la guardia baja. Salomon, que murió en el campo de exterminio de Auschwitz 12 years later, había sentado las bases del fotoperiodismo político entre bastidores. ________________________ #bestphotosever #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #backstage #power Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Notre-Dame. Lee Miller (Vogue), 1944 ・・・ Jóvenes franceses subiendo a barricadas de sacos de arena cerca de Notre-Dame, in Paris, durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial. Fotografía de Lee Miller, Vogue, October 1944. Notre-Dame ha sido un símbolo de la belleza y la historia de París durante generaciones. Hace tres días, la aguja icónica de la catedral se incendió y finalmente se derrumbó. Aunque la causa aún no está clara, las autoridades habrían dicho que podría estar relacionada con las obras de renovación del sitio histórico. Las multitudes se congregaron en las calles y puentes de París para observar y llorar el despliegue de unos 400 bomberos en la catedral para trabajar en la contención de las llamas. #Repost @voguemagazine. Gracias @cristinatrullen por el enlace. ________________________ #bestphotosever #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #notredame #power Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Abraham Lincoln. Mathew Brady, 1860 Abraham Lincoln was an Illinois congressman little known national aspirations when he came to New York City in February 1860 para hablar en la Cooper Union. El discurso tenía que ser perfecto, pero Lincoln también sabía la importancia de la imagen. Before the podium, se detuvo en el estudio fotográfico de Mathew B. Brady en Broadway. El retratista, que había fotografiado a todos, desde Edgar Allan Poe hasta James Fenimore Cooper, y que haría una crónica de la próxima Guerra Civil, sabía alguna cosa sobre la importancia del primer impacto. Colocó al desgarbado Lincoln en una postura de hombre de Estado, apretó el cuello de su camisa para ocultar su largo cuello y retocó la imagen para mejorar su aspecto. En un clic de un obturador, Brady disipó lo que Lincoln dijo que eranrumores de mi larga y desgarbada figura…. convirtiéndome en un hombre de aspecto humano y porte digno”. By capturing the youthful features of Lincoln before the ravages of the Civil War will engrave face the stresses of the Oval Office, Brady lo presentó como un candidato tranquilo. La posterior charla de Lincoln ante una audiencia de 1.500 People, en su mayoría republicana, fue un éxito rotundo, y la foto de Brady pronto apareció en publicaciones como Harper’s Weekly y en carteles electorales, lo que la convierte en el ejemplo más poderoso de una foto utilizada como propaganda de campaña. As the spread portrait, impulsó a Lincoln desde el borde de la grandeza hasta la Casa Blanca, donde conservó la Unión y puso fin a la esclavitud. Como Lincoln admitió más tarde, “Brady y el discurso de Cooper Union me hicieron Presidente de los Estados Unidos”. ________________________ #bestphotosever #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #Lincoln #portrait Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Kuwait, un desierto en llamas. Sebastião Salgado, 1991 La guerra Irak-Kuwait no solo dejó víctimas mortales -que son las que de verdad importan- sino también produjo otra catástrofe entre enero y febrero de 1991, mientras la coalición liderada por Estados Unidos expulsaba a las fuerzas iraquíes de Kuwait. Las tropas de Saddam Hussein respondían creando un infierno. Incendiaron unos 700 pozos petrolíferos y un número indeterminado de zonas inundadas de petróleo que pronto ardieron de forma virulenta y se extendieron, provocando una de las mayores catástrofes medioambientales que se recuerdan. Mientras los desesperados esfuerzos por contener y extinguir el incendio iban progresando, el fotógrafo Sebastião Salgado que se encontraba casualmente en Venezuela fotografiando su inmensa industria petrolífera, se entera de que estaban ardiendo los pozos y entonces viajó a Kuwait para ser testigo directo de la crisis. En cuanto se percató de que las fuerzas de la alianza entraron en suelo kuwaití visionó que la historia “real” de aquel momento iba a estar en aquellos campos petrolíferos. Salgado no estaba preparado para lo que se iba a encontrar: equipos de diez hombres teñidos de negro por el petróleo trabajando metódicamente en unas condiciones que eran insoportables. El calor era tan fuerte que la lente más pequeña se le deformó y el ruido constante de los pozos también era tan intenso que solo podían comunicarse los trabajadores gritándose mutuamente al oído. ________________________ #bestphotosever #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #salgado #kuwait Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

 

See this post on Instagram

 

Woman with a flower. Marc Riboud, 1967 The 21 October 1967, almost 100.000 personas marcharon en Washington, D.C. para manifestarse pacíficamente alrededor de los edificios del Pentágono en protesta contra la guerra de Vietnam. En fotógrafo de la agencia Magnum, Marc Riboud, documentó la marcha. La última imagen que capturó fue el de Jan Rose Kasmir, of the 17 Years, mientras sostenía una flor de crisantemo ante una hilera de soldados de la Guardia Nacional que portaban bayonetas. Kasmir no era consciente de la fotografía que se estaba tomando en ese momento, pero la imagen ha llegado a representar la valentía y el poder de la protesta pacífica. En una entrevista a The Guardian en 2015, Jan Rose Kasmir dijo: “No fue hasta que vi el impacto de esta fotografía que me di cuenta de que no era sólo una locura momentánea, sino que estaba defendiendo algo importante”. ________________________ #bestphotosever #photo #storytelling #historyphoto #vietnam #peace Sigue estas historias en #GRelatos

A shared post of Guillem Recolons Argenter (@guillemrecolons) The

Camera image by David MacFarlane on Shutterstock.com

Suscríbete al blog

In addition to receiving the news in your email, llévate gratis el ebook:
41 branded women

41 women with brand 3d ebook

Leave a Comment

  I agree with the privacy policy

Basic information on data protection

Responsible » Guillem Recolons Argenter

Purpose » Management of doubts and customer services

Legitimation » Consent of the interested party

Rights » You have the right to access, rectify and delete data, as well as other rights, as explained in the additional information

Additional information » You can consult additional and detailed information on Personal Data Protection on my website guillemrecolons.com