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You are not what you promise, if not you show

While I have the honor of meeting Patrick Renvoise, expert in neuromarketing, I completely agree with your statement: We are not what we promise, we are what we show. I do not intend in this post theorizing about neuromarketing, that's what the specialists. But the claim that titles this article deserves a reflection from the perspective of personal branding.

In any process of consulting personal branding there is only one thing beyond our control: Actually execution of an action plan. I can advise a person to write on a given topic to convince a certain audience. But I can not write about him; yes, I will perhaps early in the process, to cheer up, to demonstrate that writing is not so difficult. But writing, in the long run, would be devoid of authenticity, prove false.

When a large company president issues a speech, your personal brand is present. The same applies to a political leader; You can being advised, but in the end the speech has to chart its mark. Otherwise it will not be credible, at least in the medium term.

As much as we help someone to define its proposal, his message, eventually that promise needs to be demonstrated by card issuer. remember that, at the end, everything is known and masks just revealing what lies behind.

The conclusion can not be other: personal branding does not work miracles, in the end everyone has to be responsible for complying with the plan. A doctor can help you stop smoking, but can not make you stop smoking physically, that action up to you.

RESEARCH 'Neuromarketing': A study shows that anti-smoking campaigns trigger the urge to smoke

Excerpted from The World: Advertisers should rethink their methods in view of the findings of Martin Lindstrom. Subliminal factor is more important than it seems, according to the new book he exposes sales expert, ‘Buyology‘, a study of how consumers react to the impacts of brands.

For example, and an anti-smoking campaign warns the public of the dangers of smoking, the message, rationally, it makes perfect sense. However, thesis for Lindstrom, It is counterproductive: Get that smokers have more desire to smoke rather than less.

The book 'Buyology: truths and lies about what we buy’ He has needed a three-year and invesigación of ‘neuromarketing’ which it reached seven million dollars (5.436.000 euros), as indicated by the publication 'Advertising Age'. Lindstrom and his team have used the latest neurological techniques 2.000 five different people to decipher the behavior of human beings countries when buying is.

Among its findings, It notes that consumers are not only guided by conscious motivations; also by the subconscious. “Most of the decisions we make every day are performed on a part of the brain in which we are not even aware”, Lindstrom explained.

Responsible for the book and the study wanted to find out “What makes a brand be attractive”, but the response has been complicated. In the case of cigarettes especially. When the the tested subjects were asked whether the warnings of the dangers of snuff work, most of them answered without hesitation: “Yes”. It was the conscious side… your subconscious contradicts.

Actually, The results conclude that, When this question was accompanied by images, smokers were more eager to get a cigarette from his pack.

Fallos del ‘product placment’

Another of the most llamtivos research results Lindstrom downplays brand logos, since the book ensures that other senses, as smell or hearing, more often they mark the final decision of consumers.

The study also demystifies the power of 'product placement', the advertising technique consisting of placing a product of a brand in a TV show. In the 'reality' American Idol ', Coke and Ford spent the same amount, but consumers retained much more the image of the beverage company, as it was much more integrated into the action.

The author, whose book has just been published, recommends the 'neuromarketing’ to decipher these secrets, that surely will mark future advertising research.